Algorithms for updating minimum spanning trees

A minimum spanning tree (MST) or minimum weight spanning tree is a subset of the edges of a connected, edge-weighted (un)directed graph that connects all the vertices together, without any cycles and with the minimum possible total edge weight.

Currency is an acceptable unit for edge weight – there is no requirement for edge lengths to obey normal rules of geometry such as the triangle inequality.

There may be several minimum spanning trees of the same weight; in particular, if all the edge weights of a given graph are the same, then every spanning tree of that graph is minimum.

If each edge has a distinct weight then there will be only one, unique minimum spanning tree.

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A second algorithm is Prim's algorithm, which was invented by Jarnik in 1930 and rediscovered by Prim in 1957 and Dijkstra in 1959.

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